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Al Caucci Fly Fishing
1250 Winterdale Road
Starlight, PA, 18461

Phone : 1 ( 570 ) 635 - 5897
email : alcaucci@hancock.net


Al Caucci Fly Fishing
   


Stream Reports and Hatch Information
Last Update posted - May 30, 2014

 

Scotty with a great brown

Delaware River Report - May 30, 2014

IT's hard to believe that it is already the end of May and we still have Hendrickson's on the Delaware - especially on the upper WB and EB where the trout are still keying on the Ehephemerlla "X", Dark Hendrickson, in sizes 14 and 16.

This should continue into early June making it the latest of these hatches in my memory. The best part of this is that we can expect heavy hatches of Sulphers (E. dorothea and E. invaria) along with the Big Stenos, March Brown (S. vicarium and fuscm), Light cahills (S. ithaca and canadensis). Plus the big Green and Brown Drake Ephemere mayflies well into June. If relatively cool water temps prevail on the Mainstem for the next month fishing should be good throughout the system, especially since the flows continue to be extraordinarily good.

Good fishing to you all!! 

Current Important Hatches:

Light Hendrickson (Ephemerella subvaria) 12, 14  waning

Dark Hendrickson (Eph "X) 14  waning

Blue Quill (Paraleptaphlebia adoptiva) 16, 18 waning

Baetis various #16, 18   best on cloudy days  waning

Brachycentrus caddis, tan, apple green, charcoal 16, 18, 20

Glossosoma caddis blue green 16, 18 in progress

Hydopscyche caddis tan 16, 18 starting

March Brown (Steno vicarium) 10  2&3x lg  starting

Grey Fox (Steno fuscum now S vicarium) starting

Light Cahill (Steno ithaca and canadensis - now Macaffertium ithaca ) 12, 14 coming soon.

Sulphur (Ephemerella dorothea and invarria) 14, 16, 18  starting

Green Drake (Ephemera gutulatta) 10, 12  4x lg  coming soon

Brown Drake (Ephemera simulans) 10,12 coming soon

Note: for up to the minute flows see all the pertinent flow gages on the upper Delaware River system listed below, as well as the current percentage of the reservoir capacities so just click on!

- Click Below for up to the minute flows and water temps.
West Branch's Walton Gauge (Reservoir Inflow)
West Branch's Stilesville Gauge
West Branch's Hale Eddy Gauge
West Branch's Hancock Gauge
Beaverkill's Cooks Falls Gauge
East Branch's Harvard Gauge
East Branch's Fish's Eddy Gauge
Main Stem's Lordville Gauge
Main Stem's Callicoon Gauge

Current Reservoir Levels Maps
Delaware River Basin Storage Graphs

 

For more information please refer to: Al Caucci's Online Match the Hatch Chart

Click here for my 2012 Delaware River Trout photos.

Click here for my 2011 Delaware River Trout photos.

Click here to learn about guided fishing packages on the Delaware

HOW TO FISH THE WEST BRANCH AT VARIOUS FLOW RATES

200 - when the river drops below 200 cfs, floating is not possible and wading is easy. Fish the areas of moving water as the slow pools can get difficult. The lower stretches can get warm on sunny days.

200-400 - This is a nice level as wading is easy and there is enough flow to keep the river moving. Floating can mean a lot of dragging too. Look for fish in the tails of riffs and in the deeper stretches of pools. Lower stretches can warm up on hot, sunny, summer days.

400-700 - Great wading and floating along the entire river. The whole river stays cool and usually fishes nicely. Look for active fish throughout the river system.

700-1000 - This level is the best of both worlds. There is plenty of water to float and you can wade the river nearly everywhere. At this level look for fish out of the main current.

1000-1500 - At this level floating comes into its own. Wading is still possible in some areas, but floating is easy and gives you the ability to reach all the working fish. You will start to find fish along the banks at this level. The fish will look for slower water in which to position themselves.

1500-2500 - the river really changes character at this level. Wading is really not possible, but floating the river can yield really nice fishing. Fish can be caught on streamers and you need to find surface feeding fish along the banks and back eddies. At this level big browns can be active during the day and will take streamers.

2500+ - At this level floating is possible and fishing can be good. Wading is not possible and is dangerous. Streamers cast to the banks will take fish. Dry fly action is limited.

Significant Previous River Reports: 

Delaware River Report - May 1, 2014

The 2014 hatching season has been very slow getting started. Can't remember a year in recent history where the the Hendricksons weren't out in full force by the last few days in April. This delay is due to the Hi 30;s - mid 40;s water temps we have experienced during the entire month of April.

During the last 3 weeks I have only floated the river 4 times due to the wet, cold windy weather and the high flows. Yesterday I floated the WB with a good friend and made my first cast of the year to a rising trout. I hooked and landed a small 14 inch rainbow and my partner hooked a small brown.

As i write this report the air temp has dropped into the 40's again and we don't expect relief untll the weekend.

The Paralep hatches are just starting and Hendricksons should start on the entire system by the weekend if the water temps get into the 50's 

Current Important Hatches:

Light Hendrickson (Ephemerella subvaria) 12, 14  just starting

Dark Hendrickson (Eph "X) 14  just starting

Blue Quill (Paraleptaphlebia adoptiva) 16, 18 in progress

Baetis various #16, 18   best on cloudy days in progress

chimera caddis 16, 18, 20

Early Black and Brown stonefly (Taeniopterx stonefly) 16, 18

Tiny Black Stonefly (Caenidea) 18, 20

 

 

Delaware River Report - Oct, 20, 2013

This will be my last fishing report for 2013. I will resume reports after April 1, 2014.

Recently I floated the WB with my 2 friends, Tony May and Jeff White and although it was relatively slow Jeff set us up on some nice brown trout, Tony got a fat 17 incher and my wild  brown was an inch or 2 larger.

Fishing has been fair to slow on the branches and the Main over the past month especially in the sunlit days which have been prevalent. On cloudy days the hatches pick up a bit and it is possible to hook a few nice ones.

There are still decent Pseudo #20 - 24's activity along with sporadic hatches of Iso's and Steno's and some decent Heptagenia hebe action, plus sporadic small sp. of Ephemerella BWO's. Various #18 - 20 brown and charcoal caddis are on the air but not on the surface, my guess is that the fish are taking the pupa underneath. This action should continue the rest of the month as long as the weather stays above 50 degrees and water temps stay in the high 40's to high 50's.

 

Current Important Hatches:

Light Cahill (steno hatches 12, 14 and sibbling sp.   sporadic

Sm BWO (Ephemeralla small sp #18, 20, 22)  sporadic

Isonychia #10, 12 4x long  sparse, cloudy days best

Baetis various #16, 18   best on cloudy days

Psuedos #20 - 24   best on cloudy days

Various Brown and Tan Caddis #16, 18, 20  sparce

 

Delaware River Report - August 28, 2013

Just returned from my family vacation on the Cape, was great! So here is my new report which is similar to the late July report in terms of various hatching activity. But the conditions now are a lot tougher due to the med to lower flows, gin clear water and bright sun. This is a tough combo to fool those big browns on the WB and Main (lower EB is too warm for trout in the summer).If you want to use small dries, 6 & 7X are usually needed.

 However, rainbow fishing in the riffs is easier. Sporadic rises in the riffs or just fishing the water can pay off using #12 Iso's and #14 Steno patterns. John Miller and I did just that a few weeks ago on the Mainstem and landed a half dozen or more bows topping out at about 20 inches, but 6X was necessary.

Due to mild weather conditions and on and off thunderstorms which have kept the reservoirs close to 90% resulted in almost adequate  FFMP/OST releases at Cannonsville. This would not be the case in a normal summer with hot condtions and little rain. Water Temps in the Mainstem to Lordville have been around 65 to 72 degrees which are not good trout temperatures. The lower WB has been in the mid 50's to mid 60's which is good for the trout but not the hatches, upper WB has had excellent water temps between high 40's and hi 50's very good for hatching and feeding trout.

Tight lines and careful releases!

Current Important Hatches:

Light Cahill (steno Ithaca #12, 14 and sibbling sp.   (Now named Maccarffertium ithaca)  still decent hatches in progress 

 Sulpher  (Ephemerella dorothea and sibbling sp. #16, 18, 20)    in progress, and can still beheavy mostly above Hale Eddy

Sm BWO (Ephemeralla small sp #18, 20, 22)

E. Cornuta (#14, 16) off and on, cloudy days best

Isonychia #10, 12 4x long  sparse, cloudy days best

Baetis various #16, 18   best on cloudy days

Psuedos #20 - 24   best on cloudy days

Various Brown and Tan Caddis #16, 18, 20  sparce

 

 

Delaware River Report - July 30, 2013

 

Just returned from my Montana trips past week. Water was low and warmer, in the 60's instead of the 50's, and the hatches were on the down side as the main hatching started in June instead of early July, earliest start in the past 8 years. The fish were still feeding heavy on the waning insect action but we did good from 8am until about 2pm. We still hooked a lot of trout in spite of the advanced conditions, especially on the Missouri, where there are 7000 trout per mile. Pretty incredible! Check out my Mo trip trout photos.

Looks like the Delaware conditions where good in July due to the timely storms and 600 cfs release at Cannonsville due to the high water levels in the reservoirs. The reservoir is still at 92% so lets just pray that the watercrats continue to give us 600 to keep the upper few miles of the  Main stem cool enough for the trout. The Hancock gage on the WB showed 60 to 65 degree highs water temp through the entire month which is Ok but not great. And the Lordvile gage shows monthly water temp highs in the high 60's to mid 70's which is bad. Last week during the heat wave  FUDR & PFBC begged and got an additional release of 300 cfs for only 2 days which averted a catastrophe during those 2 high heat days in the high 90's.

Floated the WB with Nate on Sat and he set me up on a 20' plus brown that has been driving him nuts during my absence. We waited for him to show his head a few times and I feed him a #14 Steno Comparadun on 6x tippet. He took the first cast and put up a real ruckus. We chased him a few times and finally got a net on him, took a quick pic, and released the still frisky fat pig. Made our day. That was the good part, the bad part is that the fish were so spooky with the gin clear water, and from spring/summer pressure, that it was tough to get near more big guys and get them up on the surface, even with 6 and 7x.                                    

A transition takes place from spring hatches to summer hatches where cold water regimes of 48 to 58 F degrees exist produce hatches of Sulfurs (dorothea and sibbling species), BWO's (Psuedos #18, 20. Tiny Ephemerella sp. #18 - 22. Epeorus vitreus, Steno species #12, 14, 16, Isonychia species #12, 10. These hatches will be the most prevaent, especially the Sulphers which can still be heavy the closer you are to the dam and 48 - 52 degree water usually through first half of August.

On water that is 62 - 70 plus degrees F, there will be little to no hatching of these summer species, although some may occur toward evening on cooler overcast days. If Cannonsville releases are 600cfs and above we may also get this action through the entire WB and upper Main stem - it's all about the releases, the weather and New York City.

Tight lines and careful releases!

Current Important Hatches:

Light Cahill (steno Ithaca #12, 14 and sibbling sp.   (Now named Maccarffertium ithaca)   in progress 

 Sulpher  (Ephemerella dorothea and sibbling sp. #16, 18, 20)    in progress, can still beheavy

Sm BWO (Ephemeralla small sp #18, 20, 22)

E. Cornuta (#14, 16) off and on, cloudy days best

Isonychia #10, 12 4x long  in progress, cloudy days best

Baetis various #16, 18   best on cloudy days

Psuedos #20 - 24   best on cloudy days

Various Brown and Tan Caddis #16, 18, 20

 

 

 June 30, 2013 

Lots of rain over the last few days but water is dropping fast, but another inch and a half is predicted through July 3. This will probably cause both reservoirs to spill, so decent bottom releases will be needed to keep the water cool in both tailwaters. See Usgs flow gage links for all 3 branches for up the minute flows and water temperatures.

There is a transition taking place from spring hatches to summer hatches over the next few weeks where cold water regimes of 48 to 58 F degrees exist we should have heavy hatches of Sulfurs (dorothea and sibbling species), BWO's (Psuedos, Baetis sp. and Cornuta plus tiny Ephermerella sp.) Steno species, Isonychia species. These hatches will be the most prevaent, especially the Sulphers which are heavy hatches, usually through most of August.

On water that is 60 - 70 plus degrees F, there will be little to no hatching of these summer species, although some may occur toward evening on cooler overcast days. If Cannonsville releases are 600cfs and above we may also get this action through the entire WB and upper Main stem - it's all about the releases and New York city.

I fished with Nate a few days right before the river came up on the lower WB and the fishing was a little slow, we had some targets and hooked a few, however, the water temps where high 50's to 60, not cold enough for the heavier dorothea and BWO hatches that are found from the Game Lands upstream to the dam.

I am leaving for my Montana trips on Monday and will return on July 21 so I will not be able to renew this report until then. Wish you all great fishing on this incredible fishery, which is still hanging in there mainly due to the crazy weather and water years we have had for the past 5 years or so.

Tight lines and careful releases!

Current Important Hatches:

Light Cahill (steno Ithaca #12, 14 and sibbling sp.   (Now named Maccarffertium ithaca)   in progress

Lg. Sulpher (Ephemerella invaria #14)    waning

 Sulpher  (Ephemerella dorothea and sibbling sp. #16, 18, 20)    in progress, heavy

Sm BWO (Ephemeralla small sp #18, 20, 22)

E. Cornuta (#14, 16) off and on, cloudy days best

Isonychia #10, 12 4x long  in progress, cloudy days best

Baetis various #16, 18   best on cloudy days

Psuedos #20 - 24   best on cloudy days

Hydropsyche  Tan Caddis #16, 18

 

 

Delaware River Report - June 8, 2013

Accuweather is predicting a half to an inch and a half of rain over the next few days that will elevate the flow of all the branches by perhaps 1000cfs and that should not affect the fishing drastically unless a lot more rainfall occurs.

I fished with few friends yesterday and they hooked a few nice browns including a 19 incher. Over the past several days we have witnessed some decent hatches of dorothea sulphurs, invaria sulphurs, plus waning emergences of Green Drakes, and some decent emergences of Isonychia mayflies. A number of BWO's are also coming off which adds to the confussion of compound hatches especailly when you add the Steno ithaca duns to the mix. The spinners of these hatches can be heavy or light according to the river stretch and time of day. Most reliable spinners are the those of dorethea #16, 18, 20  and some times the Green Drakes and Steno spinners. The last few times I was out on the WB and Main I found that the best spinner action was from 6 - 8pm and that the dusk fishing was disappointing - go figure? Also there are some Hydopsyche species showing late some just flying and others emerging and egg laying.

Due to the rain over the next few days I am not listing flows and water temps on this report, instead go to my USGS links for up to the minute flows and water temp charts right below the hatch list directly below: 

Current Important Hatches:

Gray Fox (Stenonema fuscum #10, 12)  waning 

Light Cahill (steno Ithaca #12, 14)   (Now named Maccarffertium ithaca) in progress

PED (Epeorus vitreus #14 16)  in progress

Lg. Sulpher (Ephemerella invaria #14)    waning

 Sulpher  (Ephemerella dorothea #16, 18)    in progress

Isonychia #10, 12 4x long  in progress

Baetis various #16, 18   best on cloudy days

Psuedos #20 - 24   best on cloudy days

Hydropsyche  Tan Caddis #16, 18

 

 

Delaware River Report - May 18, 2013

Fishing has been tough this week. What with the end of the early season action (Hendricksons, Paraleps, etc. ), bright sunlight, gin clear water, heavy wind, and low water conditions, it has been tough on the hatch match fisherman and trout are selective as hell!

Early in the week, and last weekend, the fish were slamming big March Browns #10, 12, the occasional Hendrickson, and they sipped spinners on the surface, but that came to an end by Wednesday and they have been picky bastards on dries ever since, eating instead, the caddis pupa and mayfly emergers a few inches under the surface. March Browns, sporadic Hendrickson #12, 14 but waning and Paraleps are still around, including the Brachycentrus caddis sp. But the new kids on the block are Sulphurs (E. invaria, #14;  #16), 18 Dorothea's, as well as the Epeorus vitreus. They are keying on the emergers under the surface as well as the Hydopscyhe tan pupa #16, 18. I also saw some Gray Foxes #12 on the water, but no heads to them yet. Talk about complicated, and we're only a week away from the Green Drake hatch.

The Hendricksons are still plentiful on the WB, but are about finished on the Mainstem and the EB. Same can be said about the Paraleps and Brachycentrus caddis hatches. The best time of the day for these hatches is late afternoon and early evening. Spinners are good in the am if the wind is down but really good from about 7pm until dark on the WB.

The water is ridiculously low for this time of the year due to measly reservoir releases on the WB (only 164 cfs) and and a dropping EB. If this continues for 3 or 4 days, and we don't get and inch of rain, and the weather hits high 70's to low 80's you can expect the water temp in the lower WB and the entire Mainstem and the lower EB to reach 70F degrees and beyond. This would result in thermal damage to the trout, the hatches and of course it will kill the  fishing. All this is occurring while both reservoirs are over 98% full, and the total NYC storage is 97.6% ...... how ridiculous is that and it's only the middle of May. Come on NYC, give us some water!!! The lousy FFMP/OST releases just don't cut it!  it's a pity that NYC insists on hording more water than they will ever use at the expense of  the local communities and fishermen who come here from all over nation and the world.

 

Current Flows and Temps - (scroll down for links to the river gages and reservoir levels)

West Branch at Walton - 230 cfs (Reservoir Inflow)
West Branch release at Stilesville (Cannonsville Reservoir} - 164 cfs  43 - 48F
West Branch at Hale Eddy - 250 cfs, 52 - 58F West
Branch at Hancock  56 - 61 F
East Branch at Harvard - 226 cfs 52 - 58 F
East Branch at Fishs Eddy 750 cfs 52 - 61 F
Mainstem at Lordville - 1450 cfs 57 - 62 F
Mainstem at Callicoon - 1650  cfs 57 - 64 F
Beaverkill at Cooks Falls -
484 cfs temp unavail. 

Current Important Hatches:

Paraleptophlebia adoptiva, Blue Quill #16 - 18  - waning

Baetis vagans and cingulatus #16, 18 -   waning

Brachycentrus caddis #16 both Apple Green  and Charcoal species  -   waning

Light Hendrickson (Ephemerella subvaria) #12, 14    waning

Dark Hendrickson (Ephemerella "X" #14   waning

March Brown (Steno. vicarium #10, 12)    peak  (Now named Maccarffertium vicarium)

Gray Fox (Stenonema fuscum #10, 12)  starting  

Light Cahill (steno Ithaca #12, 14)  soon  (Now named Maccarffertium ithaca)

Early Spring Sulpher (Ephermerella invaria #14)   starting

PED (Epeorus vitreus #14 16)  starting

Lg. Sulpher (Ephemerella invaria #14)    starting

 Sulpher  (Ephemerella dorothea #16, 18)    starting

Hydropsyche  Tan Caddis #16, 18

 

 

Delaware River Report - May 8, 2013

Fishing with my friends, Nate, Mark, Bill, and Steve over the past week we landed  about a dozen browns and rainbows between 19" and 25". I have landed and safely released 5 fish between 20 and 25 inches during this period. The water is low and gin clear and 6X tippet with perfect drifts are a must to hook these fish in these conditions.

The Hendricksons are still plentiful on the WB, but are past peak on the Mainstem and the EB. Same can be said about the Paraleps and Brachycentrus caddis hatches. The best time of the day for these hatches is late afternoon and early evening. Spinners are good in the am if the wind is down but really good from about 7pm until dark. We are spotting some March Browns (Steno. vicarium #10, 12) and Large Spring Sulphers (Ephemerella invaria #14).

As I warned in my previous reports (see below) that if we don't get at least 1 inch of rain per week, the fishery would be in deep trouble early in the season due to the ridiculously low reservoir releases on the WB (only 194 cfs). If this continues and we don't get the rain, and the weather gets into the mid 70's to low 80's you can expect the water temp in the lower WB and the entire Mainstem to reach 70F degrees and beyond. This would do grave thermal damage to the trout, the hatches and of course, there would be no fishing. All this is occurring while both reservoirs are over 98% full, and the total NYC storage is 97.2%

The river levels are so low at this writing that you can't row a drift boat on the EB, WB and most of the upper Mainstem, effecting the economy of the guides, fishing businesses and local businesses like restraints and hotels - it's a pity that NYC insists on hording more water than they will ever use at the expense of  the local communities and fishermen who come here from all over nation and the world. I WILL KEEP YOU POSTED ON THIS!

Please Support Friends of the Upper Delaware (FUDR) to help the sustain the wild trout that we all love. Click here to find out more or e-mail info@fudr.org to receive the latest alerts and updates.

 

 

Delaware River Report - April 29 2013

Caught my first spinner fall of the year yesterday with my buddy Nate Eckhaus and my son Blair. Steady sipping big browns to Hendrickson and Paralep spinners, All three of us landed a fish over 20 inches but Nate's fish was a whopping two footer! Will put the photo up today if I can.

Heavy hatches of "Hendricksons" are now in progress on a daily basis, starting about 2:30 or 3 pm and dwindling until about 5 pm. Some of the Paraleps and Baetis start in around noon and fish are taking these until the "Hendricksons" start, then they usually switch over to the larger and meatier Hendricksons when they start to pop!! The Brachycentrus caddis, both apple and charcoal caddis hatches, have also started in earnest and the trout are feeding mostly on the pupa stage when they are not on the Hendricksons. This activity may continue sporadically on some stretches until dark. As I mentioned earlier look for sipping fish at sunset eating Hendrickson and Paralep spinners.

Water flows on the EB, WB and Main are still at good levels for both wading and floating and the water temps are ideal for this time of the year due to the cool weather, recent rain and cold 400 cfs release from Cannonsville on the WB. Same can be said for the EB and Mainstem at this time.

Currently early stoneflies are fading, #14 Early Black and Brown stoneflies (Taeniopterx) and fish are now focused on the heavy hatches of early season mayflies. The Chimmara caddis #18 are also fading in importance as the trout focus on the Hendricksons #12, 14 (both light and dark), Baetis vagans and cingulatus, #16, 18, and the prolific Paraleps (Blue Quill #16, 18) . The Bracycentrus Caddis hatches, both apple green and charcoal, #16's are important, especially in the pupa stage. If adults are on the stretch the same time as the more vulnerable mayflies, the trout will normally ignore the adults.

I expect expect the Hendricksons and Paraleps to continue to hatch through most of May according to water temperature, weather and releases, especially from Cannonsville on the WB, that can keep the Mainstem cool if the releases are large enough.

Releases are again subject to the FFMP/OST release plan If we don't continue to  get at least one inch of rain per week, we will soon run into   water temp problems on the lower WB and the Mainstem. 

 

 

Delaware River Report - April 19, 2013

Floated with with my buddies Nate 4/15 on the WB, and Steve 4/17 on the Main stem.  Water temps were in the 40 to 50F range and water levels were up due to a few storms on the 17th and 18th.  Very few rises to the sporadic Taneniopterx stoneflies, early browns and blacks. It appeared that the numbers of insects were too sparse to get the trout rising. There were also Hendricksons, Paraleps and Baetis that were very sporadic.

Water levels on the EB, WB and Main are at good levels due to the recent rains, as well as water temps. We should have more rain today and there is another inch and a half predicted for next week which should keep the all the branches in decent shape until early May.

Currently their are still sporadic hatches of #14 Early Black and Brown stoneflies (Taeniopterx) as well as the smaller #18 Capnia stones. The Chimmara caddis #18 are in progress but the trout are not on them yet. The Baetis vagans and cingulatus, #16, 18 are showing but the Paraleps (Blue Quill #16, 18) are very sporadic.

I expect expect the Hendricksons #12, 14 and Paraleps to hatch in earnest in the coming week and a continuation of the the early stones and caddis.

Releases are again subject to the FFMP/OST release plan which continues to screw the cold water fishery and the fishermen. Thank God for the rain and cool temperatures as we won't be able to rely on decent releases for good while. 

Please Support Friends of the Upper Delaware (FUDR) to help the sustain the wild trout that we all love. Click here to find out more or e-mail info@fudr.org to receive the latest alerts and updates.

 

 

Delaware River Report - April 13, 2013

I was floating with my buddy Nate last Sunday, Monday and Tuesday on the WB, EB and Mainstem Water levels were very low and gin clear. Water temps were in the 40 to 50F range. We were glad to get out to check what was hatching and see if the fish were reacting to the bugs. Very few rises to the sporadic Taneniopterx stoneflies, early browns and blacks. It appeared that the numbers of insects were too sparse to get the trout rising. We feed only 6 risers in 3 days of floating, really slow. We should have thrown some streamers to get a few nice trout, but we decided to keep looking for risers that could have happened on any day this time of the year.

On Thursday I floated with my friend Steve and continued our vigilance and just as we started to see a few consistent fish we ere hit with a big thunderstorm that put the fish down. The rain on Wed and Thursday was a welcome sight though considering the low levels of all the branches early in the week. These levels have doubled and tripled from those in the begining of the week and that is a good thing.

Currently their are still sporadic hatches of #14 Early Black and Brown stoneflies (Taeniopterx) as well as the smaller #18 Capnia stones. The Chimmara caddis #18 are starting and I even scoped up a few Hendricksons and Paraleps but they were few and far between.

I expect some sparce Hendricksons #12, 14 and decent Paraleps #16, 18 in the coming week and a continuation of the the early stones and caddis.

Releases are again subject to the FFMP/OST release plan which continues to screw the cold water fishery and the fishermen. Thank God for the rain and overnight lows as we won't be able to rely on decent releases for good while. 

Please Support Friends of the Upper Delaware (FUDR) to help the sustain the wild trout that we all love. Click here to find out more or e-mail info@fudr.org to receive the latest alerts and updates.

Current Flows and Temps - (scroll down for links to the river gages and reservoir levels)

West Branch at Walton - 508cfs (Reservoir Inflow)
West Branch at Stilesville - 218 cfs  36- 44F
West Branch at Hale Eddy - 485 cfs, 35 44 F West
Branch at Hancock  35 - 44F
East Branch at Harvard - 219 cfs 35 - 45 F
East Branch at Fishs Eddy 832 cfs 35 - 45 F
Mainstem at Lordville - 1840 cfs 35 - 41 F
Mainstem at Callicoon - 2090  cfs 36 - 44F
Beaverkill at Cooks Falls -
444 cfs temp unavail. 

Current Important Hatches:

Early Brown and Black Stoneflies #14

Capnia stoneflies #18, 16

Chimmara caddis #18

Paraleptophlebia adoptiva, Blue Quill #16 18

Brachycentrus caddis #16 both Apple Green and Charcoal speices

Light Hendrickson (Ephemerella subvaria) #12, 14

Dark Hendrickson (Ephemerella "X" #14 

 

 

Delaware River Report - April 5, 2013

Welcome to the new 2013 trout season, NY opened on the first Pa opened this week. Water is still too cold for mayfly hatches, mid 30's to mid 40's. But this can change quick with the current low flows in both branches and the Main stem. When flows are low the air temps have a great impact on the water temp. The forecast is for weather in the 50's and climbing to almost 70 by the middle of next week. But the long forecast is for weather in the mid 40's again by the end of next week.

Currently their are sporadic hatches of #14 Early Black and Brown stoneflies (Taeniopterx) as well as the smaller #18 Capnia stones.

I expect some early mayflies to pop by next week as well as the Chimmara Caddis #18. Look for some early season Baetis #18, #16 and perhaps some early Paraleps #18 and 16. Streamers are producing takes if you can brave the cold.

Releases are again subject to the FFMP/OST release plan which continues to screw the cold water fishery and the fishermen. Normally we would be getting 700 - 1200 cfs water through spillage but unless we get rain you can expect levels that may not even float a drift boat!

 

Delaware River Report - October 14, 2012

The hatching and fishing on the WB has improved but is still not great!The water temps are cooler due to cool nights but the day time air temps in the afternoon are in the 50's. The hatches and rises are not regular but if you look hard the long throughout the day you will spot some risers in the afternoon hours. Best tome is noon to 5pm.

Fishings has not changed much since my late Sept report but the weather at night is in the 30's and 40's now and although it has been pretty bright during the day the day time temps have been in the mostly in the  50's.The water temps throughout the 40's and 50's. The most prevalent bugs are the Heptagnia hebe and the small BWO;s (Psuedos and other small Ehemerella sp.). Plus some sporadic Iso's, Stenos and Stenocron sp. If you are really lucky you may catch flying ants on the water. These are not obvious, you really need to poke your nose on the water to see them and fish love these ants.

The Main stem and East Branch have similar hatches and water temps.  All in all, I think we still have several weeks of fair dry fly fishing in store for us soon.

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Current Flows and Temps - (scroll down for links to the river gages and reservoir levels)

 

elaware River Report - September 1, 2012

Fishings has not changed much since my early August report but the weather at night is in the 50's and although it has been pretty bright during the day the day time temps have been in the mostly on the 70's.The water temps on the WB and upper EB have improved on the mid to lower streches of the WB as well as the EB.

The watercrats have kicked up the release on the WB from 350 to 510 cfs. Perhaps with the cooler air t emps and the extra water things may turn around on the WB and Main Stem near Hancock - we shall see!

Some sporadic hatching is occurring and I have seen a few rises in the evening and mornings but things are still on the slow side. Better hatching is in the upper stretches, from the dam downstream for about 8 miles and the upper part of the EB. Although the Main is still in the duldrums when it comes to hatches and rising trout due to the mid 60 to mid 70 water temps.

Decent hatches of Pseudos and Tricos are coming on cloudy days with sporadic action of Isos, Stenos, and Heptagenia hebe. Soome sulphers are still going upstream. Keep an eye out for ant swarms as this is prime time for them to show.

For information about water politics on releases see the August 3 report below!

Please Support Friends of the Upper Delaware (FUDR) to help the sustain the wild trout that we all love. Click here to find out more or e-mail info@fudr.org to receive the latest alerts and updates.

 

Delaware River Report - August 3, 2012

 

Things continue to be slow on the upper Delaware in recent weeks due to miserly releases from the Cannonsville Dam which feed the WB and Mainstem. We can thank the failed FFMP Release Plan for this, which the "watercrats" refuse to change. More on this below.

The upper WB water temps near the dam are in the  50's (between Stilesville and the Hale Eddy) and decent hatches of Sulphers, Tricos and Pseudos can be found there with sporadic activity of Iso's, Stenos and smaller Ephemerella BWO's. There are still hatches and rising fish in this area in the afternoon and some evening action, but the mid to lower sections of the WB, which have water temps in the 60's, lack rising fish during the daylight hours. However, there can be Trico action between 9am and 11, same for dusk fishing with spinners.

The Mainstem water temps from Hancock to Lordville, and beyond, are in the 70's and is creating  dangerous thermal problems for the trout and the bugs. There are no bug hatches when water temps reach 68F degrees. Lets hope that the those healthy large browns and bows which were plentiful in the spring and in early June have moved up into the WB weeks ago as they would have a hard time surviving the thermal stress that is now prevalent throughout the Mainstem.

RIVER ALERT!     MUST READ FOR DELAWARE FISHERMEN!

 For those who are not familiar with the evolution of the current West Branch/Main Stem Delaware wild trout fishery let me summarize. It was created by 50 years of large, summer, cold water  releases from the Cannonsville reservoir, These releases averaged between 700 -1200 cfs during the months of July and August, and were the result of a Supreme Court Decree that demanded a minimum flow of over 2000 cfs at the Montague NJ gage on the river. Somehow the "watercrats" even managed to change the min flow at Montague to the current 1750 cfs. Keep in mind that the current world famous Delaware wild trout fishery was created by this Supreme Court Decree min flow at Montague.

The large cold summer releases have now been reduced to the inadequate summer release of 350 cfs, (ala the FFMP Release Schedule) that I am reporting today. In recent years, around 2007 I believe, the "watercrats" and PPL made a deal to increase the level of Lake Wallenpaupack so that PPL could release the water for electric power there in July and August via the Lackawaxen R which is just upstream from the Montague target gage by a few miles. The problem was, and still is, that these releases from the lake satisfy the Montague target and cancel out the large cold releases from the Cannonsville Reservior on the WB and jeopordize the entire WB/Mainstem Fishery. This was not within the spirit of the S C Decree and it has proven to be a killer for the future of the upper Delaware fishery, especially the Main Stem.

For 10 years now the FUDR has been fighting to get more water releases from Cannonsville. Although we have gotten the "powers that be" to make some concessions, we have not been able to get the necessary consistent release of 600 cfs from April through Sept, (800 cfs in July and August) from the all powerful NYC water machine. Over the last few years, FUDR has formed a coalition with National TU and it's affiliates, as well as the Pa F&B Comm, American Rivers and dozens of local and national conservation groups. This has brought a greater awareness to the problems of the fishery and hopefully we will get what is needed for the river in the not to distant future. My own opinion is that we need to take it back to the Supreme Court which is a long and expensive process. Anglers can help this cause by supporting FUDR and by letting the watercrats at the NYCDEP and DRBC know that you support a 600 - 800 cfs release from the Cannonsville Reservoir.

 

 

Delaware River Report - July 27, 2012

Sorry for the absence of river reports in July. Just returned from my annual Montana trip in both Missoula and Craig, where I fished the Bitterroot and Clark Fork for the first week, plus 2 weeks on the Missouri R, including the Land of the Giants. I reserve a narrow 3 week window every season, a year ahead of time, to insure my clients and I the best hatching time for large sipping trout with dry flies. We had a great time and landed plenty of trout in the 17 - 23 size range. Click on the left menu for all the details and the amazing trout photos - July 2012 photos will be available next week.

Things have been slow on the upper Delaware in recent weeks due to miserly releases from the Cannonsville Dam which feed the WB and Mainstem. We can thank the failed FFMP Release Plan for this, which the "watercrats" refuse to change. More on this below.

The upper WB water temps near the dam are in the  50's (between Stilesville and the Hale Eddy) and decent hatches of Sulphers, Tricos and Pseudos can be found there with sporadic activity of Iso's, Stenos and smaller Ephemerella BWO's. There are still hatches and rising fish in this area, but the mid to lower sections of the WB, which have water temps in the 60's, lack rising fish during the daylight hours.

The Mainstem water temps from Hancock to Lordville, and beyond, is in the 70's and is creating  dangerous thermal problems for the trout and the bugs. There are no bug hatches when water temps reach 68F degrees. Lets hope that the those healthy large browns and bows which were plentiful in the spring and in early June have moved up into the WB weeks ago as they would have a hard time surviving the thermal stress that is now prevalent throughout the Mainstem.

RIVER ALERT!     MUST READ FOR DELAWARE FISHERMEN!

 For those who are not familiar with the evolution of the current West Branch/Main Stem Delaware wild trout fishery let me summarize. It was created with 50 years of large, summer, cold water  releases from the Cannonsville reservoir, These releases averaged between 700 -1200 cfs during the months of July and August, and were the result of a Supreme Court Decree that demanded a minimum flow of over 2000 cfs at the Montague NJ gage on the river. Somehow the "watercrats" even managed to change the min flow at Montague to the current 1750 cfs. Keep in mind that the current world famous Delaware wild trout fishery was created by this Supreme Court Decree min flow at Montague.

The large cold summer releases have now been reduced to the inadequate summer release of 350 cfs, (ala the FFMP Release Schedule) that I am reporting today. In recent years, around 2007 I believe, the "watercrats" and PPL made a deal to increase the level of Lake Wallenpaupack so that PPL could release the water for electric power there in July and August via the Lackawaxen R which is just upstream from the Montague target gage by a few miles. The problem was, and still is, that these releases from the lake would satisfy the Montague target and cancel out the large cold releases from the Cannonsville Reservior on the WB and jeopordize the entire WB/Mainstem Fishery. This was not within the spirit of the S C Decree and it has proven to be a killer for the future of the upper Delaware fishery, especially the Main Stem.

For 10 years now the FUDR has been fighting to get more water releases from Cannonsville. Although we have gotten the "powers that be" to make some concessions, we have not been able to get the necessary consistent release of 600 cfs from April through Sept, (800 cfs in July and August) from the all powerful NYC water machine. Over the last few years, FUDR has formed a coalition with National TU and it's affiliates, as well as the Pa F&B Comm, American Rivers and dozens of local and national conservation groups. This has brought a greater awareness to the problems of the fishery and hopefully we will get what is needed for the river in the not to distant future. My own opinion is that we need to take it back to the Supreme Court which is a long and expensive process. Anglers can help this cause by supporting FUDR and by letting the watercrats at the NYCDEP and DRBC know that you support a 600 - 800 cfs release from the Cannonsville Reservoir.

 

River Report - June 23, 2012

Looks like we dodged a bullet over the last few days during the 90 degree heat wave! FUDR demanded and got an increase in the release from 500cfs to 850cfs  via the Cannonsville Reservoir for 48 hours to cool down the Main Stem from 78F water temps to about 70F at Lordville. Due to a screw up we only got the release for 24 hours. Although water over 68F is a harmful a cold front moved in today which will take the weather from the 90's to the 70's and 60's, so the bugs, trout and water temp should be good for the next weeks fishing up through next weekend.

What happens to the water temps on the Main Stem after that is anybodys guess as the current 500cfs release schedule dictated by the FFMP/OST is not enough to cool down the Main Stem with normal summer weater in the 80's. To be continued, stay tuned!

Hatching continues to be good in the WB and Hancock area of the Main with very good hatches of BWOs (Ephemerella cornuta and attenuata in sizes #14, 16, and 18). Also good hatches of Stenos and Stenocrons, Light Cahills and Grey Foxes) plus large Sulphers (Ephmerella invaria) and smaller dorothea sulphers, Also, Iso's  were still hatching and fish are still eating them. There are light caddis hatches of various Brachycentrus, Hydropsche and Psilotreta species.  Overcast, cool days produce the tiny Pseudo species (#22 - 28). There are heavy spinner falls at dusk during warm evenings and during daylight hours during cloudy days plus ovipositing caddis activity.

The upper West Branch still has Sulphurs hatching day time and after dark; several sibling species of E. dorothea (#16, 18) and E. invaria #14 with a bright yellow body continue to hatch heavily. The fish are well fed and persnickety on the WB so a little rain would help to cloud the water some and perhaps the trout will be less selective.

Click here to learn about guided fishing packages on the Delaware!

Please Support Friends of the Upper Delaware to help the sustain the wild trout that we all love. Click here to find out more or e-mail info@fudr.org to receive the latest alerts and updates.

Current Flows and Temps - (scroll down for links to the river gages and reservoir levels)

 

River Report - June 20, 2012

Alert!!!

Looks like the cool weather and the cool water is over as a massive heat wave is moving onto our area right into the weekend with air temps moving well into the 90s!! The Main Stem browns and bows, and the bugs have have been the best in many a year but that is all about to change if the current FFMP/OST release at Cannonsville is not increased to 800cfs. At the current 500 cfs release you can expect the water temps in the lower WB to hit over 70F and Mainstem to soar over the 75Fdegree mark and jeopardize  trout life, especially in the Main Stem from Hancock to Lordville, and worse beyond Lordville. At the minumum the trout will be seriously stressed, at worse we can expect fish kills in a few days after the water temps rise toward - 80F on the Main. This will change the Main Stem fishing the remainder of the summer.

FUDR sent an alert out to the watercrats last week and to my knowledge we did not receive a response. The release that I advocated is not a lot of water for this short period, especially since all 3 reservoirs are over 96% full, but it means a hell of a lot to the fishery and habitat, and the local economies. Jeez guys give us a break!! Cooler weather is forecasted for next week - hope it's not to late! AS of late Tuesday afternoon there has been NO increase in releases.

Prior to this heat wave the WB, and Mainstem continued to hatch very well. There were very good hatches BWOs (Ephemerella cornuta and attenuata in sizes #14, 16, and 18). Also good hatches of Stenos and Stenocrons, Light Cahills and Grey Foxes) plus large Sulphers (Ephmerella invaria) and smaller dorothea sulphers, Also, Iso's  were still hatching and fish are still eating them. There are light caddis hatches of various Brachycentrus, Hydropsche and Psilotreta species.  Overcast, cool days produce the tiny Pseudo species (#22 - 28). There are heavy spinner falls at dusk during warm evenings and during daylight hours during cloudy days plus ovipositing caddis activity.

The upper West Branch still had a plethora of Sulphurs hatching day time and after dark; several sibling species of E. dorothea (#16, 18) and E. invaria #14 with a bright yellow body continue to hatch heavily. The fish are well fed and persnickety on the WB so a little rain would help to cloud the water some and perhaps the trout will be less selective.

 

er Report - June 14, 2012

The sporadic rain, hatches, water temp, weather, flows and releases have been the same for the past 2 - 3 weeks and life continues to be good for the bugs and the trout!. The forecast is for more intermitten rain for the next few days. All reservoirs are in the high 90 percentile.

The WB, and Mainstem continue to hatch very well. The past few days there have very good hatches BWOs (Ephemerella cornuta and attenuata in sizes #14, 16, and 18). Also good hatches of Stenos and Stenocrons, Light Cahills and Grey Foxes) plus large Sulphers (Ephmerella invaria) and smaller dorothea sulphers, Also, Iso's  are still hatching and fish are still eating them. There are light caddis hatches of various Brachycentrus, Hydropsche and Psilotreta species. Plus large Golden stones and Giant Brown Stones (Acronuria and Perlidae) should continue to hatch, mostly on warm nights. Overcast, cool days produce the tiny Pseudo species (#22 - 28). There are heavy spinner falls at dusk during warm evenings and during daylight hours during cloudy days plus ovipositing caddis activity.

The West Branch has a plethora of Sulphurs hatching day time and after dark; several sibling species of E. dorothea (#16, 18) and E. invaria #14 with a bright yellow body continue to hatch heavily. The fish are well fed and persnickety on the WB however the recent rain should add a faint cloud to the water and perhaps the trout will be less seclective.

Nate and I fished over the weekend on the Main and boated a number of good fish. Nate fished solo earlier and boated a humungus 25 plus inch pig brown. Most of our fish were on sulphers, cornuta and attenuata patterns. Lets hope the weather and the water temps continue to hold out a little longer.

 

River Report - June 5, 2012

The rains and cooler weather continue. With weekly rains, cooler weather and larger summer releases (only because the reservoirs are 100% full) all 3 branches are enjoying good flows and cool water temperatures which is good for the bugs and the trout. The forecast is for more intermitten rain for the next few days. All reservoirs are at 99% or spilling.

The WB, and Mainstem continue to hatch very well. The past few days there have very good hatches BWOs (Ephemerella cornuta and attenuata in sizes #14, 16, and 18). Also good hatches of Stenos and Stenocrons (March Browns, Light Cahills and Grey Foxes) plus large Sulphers (Ephmerella invaria) and smaller dorothea sulphers, Also, Iso's  are still hatching and fish are still eating them. There are light caddis hatches of various Brachycentrus and Psilotreta species. The Hydropsche caddis are about due and the large Golden stones and Giant Brown Stones (Acronuria and Perlidae) should continue to hatch, mostly on warm nights. Overcast, cool days produce the tiny Pseudo species (#22 - 28). There are heavy spinner falls at dusk during warm evenings and during daylight hours during cloudy days plus ovipositing caddis activity.

The West Branch has a plethora of Sulphurs hatching day time and after dark; several sibling species of E. dorothea (#16, 18) and E. invaria #14 with a bright yellow body continue to hatch heavily. The fish are well fed and persnickety on the WB however the recent rain should add a faint cloud to the water and perhaps the trout will be less seclective.

Scott and I fished over the weekend on the Main and boated 4 good rainbows and a few nice browns on sulphers and yesterday the fish were really on the cornuta and attenuata.

 

River Report - May 14, 2012

After 8 weeks of hatching, the Hendricksons have finally fizzled out, except for some continuing hatches on the upper WB. Ths is the longest prolonged hatching of Hendricksons in my 43 years of fishing the Delaware river sys. The current weather is overcast, cool with showers over the next few days.

The WB, Mainstem and the EB have moved on to the next stage with Stenos (March Browns and Grey Foxes) plus large Sulphers (Ephmerella invaria) and smaller dorothea sulphers, some Iso's (see below for fly patterns) are starting to build up. There are decent caddis hatches of various Brachycentrus and Psilotreta species. Overcast, cool days are still producing Baetis and Pseudo species. There where even a few Green Drakes spotted on the Main. On balmy evenings expect some spinner action from the remaining Hendrickson and BWO species plus ovipositing caddis activity.

River Report - May 10, 2012

Recent rains continue to create a safe haven for the trout and bugs and all branches are on the high side, wadeable and floatable. Hendricksons are still hatching on the WB. 7 weeks and counting since they first started on March 20. Bad time for me to have back problems, missed a lot of one of the best springs in recent years. The WB is truly one of the best hatching rivers in the world - most rivers only have 2 - 3 weeks of Hendricksons! The Sulphers have also started on the WB along with the next stage of hatches that are just starting and are explained explained in the next paragraph.

The Mainstem and the EB have moved on to the next stage with Stenos (March Browns and Grey Foxes) plus large Sulphers (Ephmerella invaria) and some Iso's (see below for fly patterns) are starting to build up. There are decent caddis hatches of various Brachycentrus and Psilotreta species. Overcast, cool days are still producing Baetis and Pseudo species. There where even a few Green Drakes spotted on the Main. On balmy evenings expect some spinner action from the remaining Hendrickson and BWO species plus ovipositing caddis activity.

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River Report - May 1, 2012

The unseasonably cold weather and rainfall last week kept the entire fishery safe and refreshed. All that is about to change as the releases on the WB and EB are unprecedented for this time of the year, a measly 88cfs, and was bumped to 150cfs today, on the WB today thanks to the effort of FUDR, PFBC and the Coalition. The East Branch has the same problem. With no water spilling from the dams, these low releases are threatening the entire fishery from the Hale Eddy to Lordville. The water from the recent rain is dropping fast and warm/hot weather, 66 to 82 F degrees, is scheduled for the area starting tomorrow right into May 7 with only about a 1/4 inch rain in the forecast. The WB must get a minimum of 400 cfs release to get through this current hot stretch.

If air temps in the 70's and 80's become a reality as predicted, you can expect water temps in the high 60's and 70's in the lower WB, EB and upper Main Stem. FUDR and the Coalition are pressing for emergency releases from the "watercrats" to get through the critical situations that are developing. Note: the Cannonsville reservoir on the WB is over 93% full with about 600cfs going into the reservoir at this writing and only 150cfs being released!! NYC hording water again at the peril of the world famous WB and Mainstem wild trout fishery, Similar conditions prevail on the famous EB fishery.

The current water temps have been in the 40's and 50's and a drastic change to high 60's and 70's will be damaging to the trout populations and the insect hatches. Lets hope emergency releases equaling 400 cfs on the WB and 150 cfs on the EB start before this happens. I will keep you posted. You can review more of my comments on these on-going-problem in my previous April Reports directly below the hatch information.

On a brighter note, I was floating Sat and Sun with two friends and was happy to see that the Hendricksons are still hatching, mainly, the Dark Hendrickson (Ephemerella X), mostly #14's, the spinner was also on the water. There were some nice hatches of BWO's #16 and #18 (Baetis vagans) along with Brachycentrus caddis #16, #18, with apple green, brown and charcoal bodies. Also seen, were occasional large golden stones, March Browns #10 and Grey Fox(Stenos). We hooked some very big browns as well as some smaller browns and rainbows on various Hendrickson patterns. Conditions were difficult, heavy winds and low gin clear water which made for repeated casts over very spooky fish, but lots of fun!

I Will be absent from my office from 2 pm today until Saturday am due to a surgical procedure on my lower back. Will catch up then.

River Report - April 24, 2012

The events on the river since Friday have been eventful in that on that day a release at Cannonsville kicked in to keep the Montague target at 1750 cfs as demanded by the supreme court decision way back in the 50's. Prior to this release the "watercrats" were only sending 130 cfs down the West Branch! On Sunday the rains came and all the branches of the Delaware in the Hancock area are currently high and off color.We need this bad and all that Mother Nature can provide. As long as the rain continues the river will have a safe flow. We will visit the release problems again when the current conditions subside. See the 18th report below for the problems that we had last week.

The fishing is still good with Hendricksons, Paraleps and Spring caddis still hatching in a dwindling fashion. I expect this pattern to hold until the late spring Steno hatches start, probably as soon as this spate subsides and and the water gets lower and clearer in a few days. See latest hatching and fly data directly below and the April 18 report that outline the river problems further down the page, after the hatdhes list..

River Report - April 18, 2012

The Hendrickson, Paralep, mayfly hatches and Brachycentrus caddis hatches are now in the third week of emerging. I expect this will continue for another week and fizzle out! My friend Steve Atcavage said he was floating the Buck to Long Eddy stretch this weekend and spotted a number of Stenos, March Browns, so it looks like they will show up in the Hancock area by next week. In my 40 plus years of fishing the upper Delaware I have never seen March Browns in mid April. Normally, the Hendricksons don't even show until around the 20th or 25th of April? Wow!! See my list of hatches and matching fly sizes following the "4/13 river report"below.

The fishery dodged a predicted heat wave this past week end and was saved from a potential catastrophe on the river system, but only for the moment. Due to puny releases from the FFMP/OST release schedule, and the unprecedented low water for this time of the year, we are really in deep do-do! The lack of spillage at the dam and current release has all come about due to the NYCDEP FFMP and OST plans which the city folks continue to shove down our throat regardless of the tireless efforts in manpower and money from FUDR, and the PFBC organizations.

This is all happening with plenty of water in the NYC water system, about 90% current capacity. Current release on the WB is a measly 136 cfs and the flow at Hale Eddy is 215 cfs as compared to an average of about 1500 cfs flow at Hale Eddy for this time of the year in past seasons before the NYC's dreaded FFMP policy. The current EB at Harvard is only 96 cfs and the release at Pepacton is much less, another disaster in the making.

Click here to learn about guided fishing packages on the Delaware

I urge all fisherman and local folks to get on the phones and computers/emails and demand that we need much larger releases on the WB and EB immediately!! Direct your calls and emails to the NYSDEP, NYCDEP and DRBC and tell them that we need a min. of 600 cfs on the WB and 150 cfs on the EB!!!. This is critical to the fish, bugs and habitat of which is considered one of the best 5 wild trout fisheries in the world!

Please Support Friends of the Upper Delaware to help the sustain the wild trout that we all love. Click here to find out more or e-mail info@fudr.org to receive the latest alerts and updates.

April 5 River Report ref.

Let;s all pray hard for lots of rain. Due to a February run-off instead of a late March/April run-off, all 3 branches are at record low water levels which means the first 3 warm days in the 70's will blow out the rest of the early spring hatches. Absolutely incredible! The Cannonsville is 92%, but without proper releases of 600 cfs on the West Branch, it is much too low to float!! so wading is the name of the game on both the WB and upper EB. The lower EB and Mainstem are also at record lows for this time of the year and floating there means draging the boat accross the shallow riffles.

Due to the much hated FFMP release schedule, which is still in place regardless of all the work done to change it, the only relief we can get from this unprecedented situation is through lots of rain and cool weather (current release on WB is only 172 cfs at Cannonsville) so say your prayers. According to the FFMP release schedule decent releases won't be available until early June. If we get enough rain and weather remains in the 50's, there is a possibility that the Hendricksons and the other early season hatches may last until the 3rd week in April. Stay posted for further developments.

On the other hand if we only get normal or below normal rain, the entire Upper Delaware fishery is in real trouble starting when the first heat wave hits the area

Please Support Friends of the Upper Delaware to help the sustain the wild trout that we all love. Click here to find out more or e-mail info@fudr.org to receive the latest alerts and updates.

HOW TO FISH THE WEST BRANCH AT VARIOUS FLOW RATES

200 - when the river drops below 200 cfs, floating is not possible and wading is easy. Fish the areas of moving water as the slow pools can get difficult. The lower stretches can get warm on sunny days.

200-400 - This is a nice level as wading is easy and there is enough flow to keep the river moving. Floating can mean a lot of dragging too. Look for fish in the tails of riffs and in the deeper stretches of pools. Lower stretches can warm up on hot, sunny, summer days.

400-700 - Great wading and floating along the entire river. The whole river stays cool and usually fishes nicely. Look for active fish throughout the river system.

700-1000 - This level is the best of both worlds. There is plenty of water to float and you can wade the river nearly everywhere. At this level look for fish out of the main current.

1000-1500 - At this level floating comes into its own. Wading is still possible in some areas, but floating is easy and gives you the ability to reach all the working fish. You will start to find fish along the banks at this level. The fish will look for slower water in which to position themselves.

1500-2500 - the river really changes character at this level. Wading is really not possible, but floating the river can yield really nice fishing. Fish can be caught on streamers and you need to find surface feeding fish along the banks and back eddies. At this level big browns can be active during the day and will take streamers.

2500+ - At this level floating is possible and fishing can be good. Wading is not possible and is dangerous. Streamers cast to the banks will take fish. Dry fly action is limited.

Copyright 2011 Al Caucci Fly Fishing
 
Copyright 2011 Al Caucci Fly Fishing